20th
Rallye Monte-Carlo Historique

25 January - 01 February 2017

RMCH 2017 : Michel Decremer winner!
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Published on 01 February 2017
Atmosphere Valence
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Published on 30 January 2017
Renault 8 Gordini: a true legend of motor racing!
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Published on 29 January 2017
RMCH 2017: Le Quotidien #1
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Published on 25 January 2017

News

RMCH 2017 : Michel Decremer winner!
Published on 01 February 2017
The crew n°25 Michel Decremer and Yannick Albert on Opel Ascona 2000 leads the Rally before the two last Regulation Sections. Last [...]
Atmosphere Valence
Published on 30 January 2017
Valence and the Monte-Carlo Rally, a never ending love story... For this 20th edition of Rallye Monte-Carlo Historique, the Drome fans were [...]
Renault 8 Gordini: a true legend of motor racing!
Published on 29 January 2017
Some cars have marked their times, in a specific way. Renault 8 Gordini is one of them, so [...]
RMCH 2017: Le Quotidien #1
Published on 25 January 2017
Here is the 1st edition of the Quotidien du Rallye Monte-Carlo Historique 2016. We remind you that daily [...]
Communication from the Race Control
Published on 25 November 2016
To all competitors Precision concerning the article 14.1.d : The use of Xenon or Led lights is forbidden. Penalties for [...]

Presentation

Attention :
Access to the public is forbidden, by prefectural decree, on the itineraries ZR2 – Col du Corobin et ZR3 – Col de Fontbelle (road privatized to the competitors only).

Dear competitors,
We would like to remind you, in respect of the environmental laws, that it is strictly forbidden to tamper with “trees, poles, mail boxes, and houses”.
As of today, the Automobile Club of Monaco has received a lot of complaints from residents and community organizations. All competitors seen to disrespect these environmental laws, will immediately be excluded from the Rally.
We wish you good “recce” and happy holidays.

A route worthy to celebrate the event’s 20th edition! 

The 20th edition of the Rally Monte-Carlo Historique pays tribute to the participation in the 1967 Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo of French rock icon Johnny Hallyday and Henri Chemin in a Ford Mustang. Half-a-century on, the event promises to attract another strong entry to see who succeeds from the 2016 winners Daniel Perfetti and Ronnie Kessel (Alpine-Renault A110). 

As usual, the 2017 Rallye Monte-Carlo Historique will be open to cars that took part in the actual event from 1955 until 1980. To give all competitors a chance to target an honourable result, there will once again be a choice of three average speed levels to comply with during the competition.

The rally will start on Wednesday, January 25, with the week’s first Concentration Run starts from Stockholm (2,735km / 9:00am), Glasgow (2,092km / 6:00pm) and Lisbon (2,212km / 7:00pm). Another start venue option is Copenhagen (2,074km / 12:10pm) on Thursday, January 26), or competitors can choose Bad Homburg (1,242km / 2:20pm), Barcelona (1,050km / 4:30pm) or Reims (1,004km / 7:00pm) on Friday, January 27.*

The routes of the different Concentration Runs will convene in Digne les Bains from 10:00am on Saturday, January 28, before moving on to Saint André les Alpes – near the spectacular Verdon Lake and Gorges – from 10:55am. Competitive hostilities will then kick off with the first Regularity Section between Entrevaux, Val de Chalvagne and Entrevaux (15.78km) at 12:10pm. After this appetiser which takes in the Col de Félines (altitude: 930 metres), the field will head to the end-of-day halt in the Principality of Monaco.*

The rally will resume at 06:00am on Sunday, January 29, with the beginning of the Classification Run. The first test will be a classic of the modern-day event, namely a visit to the Col de Corobin (1,211m) as part of Chaudon Norante-Digne les Bains (18.63km, 7:55am) which will be used for the very first time as a Regularity Section. It will be followed by another legendary test – Thoard-Sisteron (35.74km, 9:40am) – which is famed for the eternally complex conditions found at the Col de Fontbelle (1,304m). After a halt in front of the Town Hall in Sisteron from 10:50am, competitors will head for the nearby Baronnies Provençales Natural Park for Orpierre-Laborel-Saint André de Rosans (39.34km, 12:00 noon) which is another classic that is familiar to regulars. The day’s fourth and last Regularity Section will be Vassieux en Vercors-Saint Jean en Royans (23.55km, 12:45pm) via the Col de L’Echarasson (1,146m) which could well spring a few surprises before the overnight stop Valence which will be reached at 4:00pm.*

From there, the first part of the Common Run will strike out to France’s Ardèche region on Monday, January 30 at 07:00am. The day will begin with La Croze-Saint Julien du Gua-Antraigues sur Volane (50.64km, 8:00am), followed immediately by the mandatory ‘gourmet’ halt at the Jouanny family-owned La Remise restaurant! The competition will continue with Burzet-Le Chambon (39.70km, 9:53am).*

The lunchtime break is scheduled for 11:50am in Saint Agrève where the sampling of local produce is always a popular moment for all. Unlike in 2016, when the afternoon saw the rally head for France’s Haute-Loire department, competitors will stay in the Ardèche this time, with a run through Saint Pierre sur Doux-Col du Buisson (22.36km, 12:30pm) before the day ends with Lamastre-Gilhoc sur Ormèze-Plats (36.00km, 1:35pm) which has featured since 2015. The drive back to Valence will take in the traditional and ever-popular stop in Tournon sur Rhône (Quai Farconnet) at 3:00pm.*

The second part of the Common Run on Tuesday, January 31, which begins at 05:00, will mark the return of Col de L’Echarasson (1,146m)-La Cime du Mas (17.96km, 6:22am), chased by a classic in the Drôme Provençale region (Saint Nazaire le Désert-La Motte Chalancon, 21.60km, 8:19am) and the awesome Verclause-Laborel-Eygalayes test (37.70km, 9:11am). The last Time Control before parc ferme in Monaco will be set up in La Turbie (Place Neuve) with the first crew due to check in at 2:50pm.*

The Final Night Run (January 31-February 1) will start in Monaco at 9:00pm and features two notorious tests: Luceram-Lantosque (26.89km, 10:00pm) in the Vésubie Valley, and La Bollène Vésubie-Moulinet-Sospel (52.78km, 10:45pm) which includes the celebrated Col de Turini (1,604m). After the event’s last against-the-clock sections, survivors will head back to Monaco (Port Hercule) for the finish where they are due to arrive at 1:20am.*

The 20th Rallye Monte-Carlo Historique will conclude on Wednesday, February 1, with prize-giving and the Gala Evening in the Monte-Carlo Sporting Club’s Salle des Etoiles (evening dress or dark clothing mandatory).

*These hours may be subject to changes. (See itineraries)